Archives for posts with tag: portraits

Luca. Absorbing. 2010. Platinum-palladium print on (Buxton) 100% cellulose from 8×10 original negative.

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Vejiben Odedra, sitting in the shadow, Dhaupara, Gujarat. India, November 29, 1995. Platinum-palladium print on 100% cellulose (Wyndstone vellum) from original 8x10 inch negative.

Vejiben Odedra, sitting in the shadow, Dhaupara, Gujarat. India, November 29, 1995.
Platinum-palladium print on 100% cellulose (Wyndstone vellum) from original 8×10 inch negative.

I posted a scan of this negative a couple of years ago, and point to it as an example of just how ‘flat’ the digitally processed version of this image feels, even though it presents a lot more (seemingly) shadow detail.

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detail:

 

Inventory Box 02

Clive Strutt, South Ronaldsay, Orkney, 1983.
Platinum-palladium print on 100% cellulose (van Gelder simili japon) from original 8×10 inch negative.

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detail:

Zib Edgley, Frome, England, 1989. Platinum-palladium print on 10

Zib Edgley, Nunney, Somerset, England, 1989.
Platinum-palladium print on 100% cellulose paper (Wyndstone vellum ) from 8×10 original negative.

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Detail:

Zib Edgley, Frome, England, 1989. Platinum-palladium print on 10

Allan B Jones, 1992. Platinum-palladium print on Wyndstone vellu

Allan B Jones, 1992.
Platinum-palladium print on Wyndstone vellum from 8×10 inch original negative.

I wrote about this portrait and Allan in previous posts. He is a most humble, and wonderful, painter. I hope someday that he and Richard Walker meet.

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detail:

Allan B Jones, 1992. Platinum-palladium print on Wyndstone vellu

Prabhulal Maharaj, Bholeswar, Jamnagar, Gujerat, India, December

Prabhulal Maharaj, Bholeswar, Jamnagar, Gujerat, India, December, 1995.
Platinum-palladium print on Wyndstone vellum from 8×10 inch original negative.

I first met Prabhulal-lji, a priest, (the ‘ji’ is a suffix indicating respect in many Sanskritic Indian languages) when I was eleven. Almost thirty years later, here we were together again, with my parents. What I had not understood as a tweener, but left me humbled, burdened and becalmed now, as we talked and photographed in his kitchen was this:
his ancestors, a family of priests, had been my family’s spiritual guides for about seventeen generations.

We lose so much. We are relieved of so much.

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Prabhulal Maharaj, Bholeswar, Jamnagar, Gujerat, India, December

Richard Walker, Glasgow, October, 1984. Platinum-palladium print

Richard Walker, Glasgow, October, 1984.
Platinum-palladium print on Wyndstone vellum from 8×10 inch original negative.

Richard, and his flat-mates (room-mates in US English) all took me in at a very, very difficult time of my life. All artists, all somehow letting me just be. Watching, waiting, and just with one expectation – that I survive. Elise, Anne, Richard, I’ll always be grateful. I watched Richard paint, day after day, and most important, how he went from raw ingredients to exquisite painted image. Putting out the darkness. Here were the crafts of magic and the nutrients of survival. I continue to admire his work. The finest.

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detail:

Richard Walker, Glasgow, October, 1984. Platinum-palladium print

Lizzie Motlow, Cheyne Street, Edinburgh. February, 1986. Platinu

Lizzie Motlow, Cheyne Street, Edinburgh. February, 1986.
Platinum-palladium print on Fabriano 5, lightly tea-stained, from 8×10 original.

This is what I wrote in a previous post:

A few days after the Challenger Space Shuttle Disaster.

My friend and fellow photographer was visiting from the USA, when we saw live footage of the disastrous mis-launch. The accident affected Lizzie deeply, being, like me, of that generation whose visions and wishes for the future grew along with the space programs of the USA and USSR. Even stranger, in this particular case, was the coincidence that the Challenger pilot, Michael J. Smith, shared Lizzie’s birthday. I remember talking about the disturbing tension between the tragedy of the event and the photographs, which were and still are so beautiful. And so with the fayiumi, encapsulating as they do the tragedy of loss and mortality with beauty.

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Lizzie Motlow, Cheyne Street, Edinburgh. February, 1986. Platinu

 

Margaret Meriwether, Sewanee, TN, 1994. platinum-palladium print

Margaret Meriwether, Sewanee, TN, 1994.
Platinum-palladium print on Crane 100 cellulost paper, from 11×14 inch original negative

I printed this a long time ago, around 1995, and now find myself rethinking the image. What does that mean? Words cannot effectively provide an answer, and I will, in the coming days, reprint the negative. Watch this spot….

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detail:Margaret Meriwether, Sewanee, TN, 1994. platinum-palladium print

…and this is why paper is so important. A lot of pt-pd printers/photographers forget (or never experience-express) that resolution matters. The chemical ‘field’ of paper has a profound effect on the image, as does the resolution of the original negative. This particular print was made, I feel, with an optimal combination of large negative and very well-suited paper. Look at the the skin tones and deep continuity of rendering here:

Margaret Meriwether, Sewanee, TN, 1994. platinum-palladium print

or here:

Margaret Meriwether, Sewanee, TN, 1994. platinum-palladium print

Chai. Head. Gujarat, India, 1995. Platinum-palladium print on Wy

 

Chai. Head. Gujerat, India, 1995.
Platinum-palladium print on Wyndstone vellum 100% cellulose from 8×10 original negative.

As I was photographing the young woman in the previous post, this patient teenager, my host’s son, was standing right behind me waiting with my cup of chai. And he remained just there as I pivoted the 8×10 camera around. A gift.

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detail:

Chai. Head. Gujarat, India, 1995. Platinum-palladium print on Wy

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