Leonel Jeremie in his bedroom, Bois Jolie, Haiti. July, 2014.

Leonel Jeremie in his bedroom, Bois Jolie, Haiti. July, 2014.

NEWS: August 1-2, I’ll be presenting at The 2014 Creativity Seminar at Austen Riggs Center, Stockbridge, Massachusetts, USA. Intended for therapists, this year’s conference will consider “the process of translation in different areas of creative endeavor in the visual medium of photography, through the embodied work of translation by an orchestral conductor, via the interpretative work of translation by a psychoanalyst, and by means of the multilayered acts of translation in theater. Our aim is to understand more deeply the subjective and objective nature of interpretation and translation and to stimulate our use of these ideas in our various clinical, educational, and other settings.

Patients and therapists are constantly engaged in the practice of translation. Translation is a creative act involving the intersection of objective practice and subjective meaning. In the “talking cure,” desires, thoughts, fantasies, symptoms, and dreams are gradually metamorphosed (in part) into words and sentences, which render them meaningful in an intersubjective context and make them more accessible to conscious control. Similarly, we can see that composers, artists, actors, conductors, and translators of literature from one language to another engage the same way. How does translation work? What is it in a translation that gets carried over, and what gets left behind? How can we understand more about the elements that spill over outside the bounds of what is conscious and controlled and affect it?”

Other upcoming events:
September 11, 2014, a talk about my work in Haiti, at Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN;
October 9 to November 4, 2014, exhibition of Haiti work at Univ of Central Missouri Gallery of Art & Design;
October 21-24, 2014, co-presenter on a Collaborative Workshop in Photograph Conservation: platinum and palladium photographs, sponsored by  The Foundation of the American Institute for Conservation of Historic and Artistic Works, in collaboration with the Smithsonian National Museum of the American Indian, National Gallery of Art, Library of Congress, and the Smithsonian National Museum of American History